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Offline AndrewChristlieb

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Celestial Phenomena
« on: January 04, 2012, 06:16:29 PM »
Ok it came up a while back that we've been playing for 14 or so years with the same old terrain, which isn't really bad but its always fun to try new things so I set down and wrote up a few things (along with snagging a few of the better ideas to pass through warp storm etc) and worked it into some new charts for the random generator.

First off I'm going to go over the Asteroid Field and Gas/Dust Cloud charts. These are special versions of the mentioned phenomena and as such should not appear on a table in great quantities unless you and your opponent agree to play as such. Anytime an asteroid field or gas/dust cloud is generated a special variant will be generated on a D6 roll of 6. For example in the Primary biosphere if you roll a 4 you have generated d3 gas dust clouds. After rolling you d3 to determine the quantity you roll 1d6 for each cloud for any 6's rolled you have generated a special variety of gas/dust cloud. For special varieties there are three charts (id love to get 2 more of each gas/dust and asteroids to just make it a 2d6 roll but this has been working for now). Each chart has a minor moderate and major hazard (as has been used in previous special phenomenon rules).After determining that there is a special phenomenon roll again to determine which chart to use.


for asteroids the charts are

1-2 (roll d3)                        3-4 (roll d3)                        5-6 (roll d3)                       
1. Asteroid Belt                  1. Wreckage                       1. Hulks
2. Comet                            2. Magnetic Asteroid Field  2. Debris Field
3. Derelict Minefield            3. Meteor Shower              3. Rogue Asteroid

for gas/ dust clouds the charts are

1-2 (roll d3)                        3-4 (roll d3)                        5-6 (roll d3)                       
1. Gas/Dust Belt                 1. Cerulean Cloud              1. Metaphasic Cloud
2. Comet                            2. Radioactive Cloud           2. Debris Field
3. Plasma Cloud                 3. Metreon Cloud                3. Temporal Vortex

As I said some of this will be familiar from previous works, some of this is taken from other games and a teeny tiny bit is just crap that sounded good  ;D.

I also have rules for new battle grounds and chance encounter but I haven't had the time to type them up yet and was hoping to get some feedback on these first. Thanks for checking it out! -Andrew
I don't make the rules, I just think them up and write them down.

Offline AndrewChristlieb

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2012, 06:17:07 PM »
The rules

ASTEROID

1. ASTEROID BELT

An asteroid belt, like the asteroid field, is formed out of the
fragments leftover from planet collisions during the creation of
star systems or the debris from the destruction of planets and
moons. Asteroid belts however tend to be much larger
and will often form an unbroken ring around their stars.
Effects: Aside from its method of placement, an asteroid belt
is treated as an asteroid field in all respects, as shown on page
44 of the rulebook.
Placement: Use the normal pebbles and unused kitty litter to
represent the asteroid belt. The belt extends in a straight line
from one table edge to the opposite table edge, running
parallel to the sunward table edge. It will be the normal
D3x5cm in widt


2. DEBRIS FIELD

These are areas of space not unlike asteroid fields and such
like, created from leftover natural materials, fragments of past
battles or a combination of both. They are however
considered a lot denser and are therefore significantly more
difficult and dangerous to navigate.
Effects: Debris fields combine the effects of both gas/dust
clouds and asteroid fields, as described on page 44 of the
rulebook, so a ship trying to navigate through one will suffer
all the effects of having a blast marker placed on it and will
also have to make a Leadership test to avoid taking damage.
If the test is failed, remember that the ship will count as
having one less shield than normal, due to the gas cloud
effect, so this can prove to be very deadly to Escorts.
Placement: Debris fields can be made from either rocks or
parts of ships, surrounded by flock or cotton wool. Nominate
a point on the table and roll a scatter die. The debris field is
10cm wide and will extend for D6 x 10cm away from the
point in the direction indicated by the scatter die.


3. COMET

A comet is a huge ball of compressed ice, dirt and other light
materials that originate from the fringes of star systems. They
usually move in various eccentric orbits that take them from
the coldness of deep space to the inner regions of star
systems. When a comet gets close to a star, the increasing heat
will melt away its surface, thereby creating its characteristic
tail of gas and dust.
Effects: The comet is treated as an asteroid, as described on
page 44 of the rulebook, so any ship that comes into base
contact with it must pass a Leadership test to avoid taking
damage. The tail is treated as a gas/dust cloud, also on page
44, with the exception that it will block line of sight due to its
greater density. At the beginning of each turn, the comet will
move 10cm towards the table edge furthest from its initial
placement. When this edge is reached, the comet is
considered to have reached its zenith and will begin moving
back the same way.
Placement: Use a small piece of polystyrene to represent the
comet itself (you can use a ice cube, but that will quickly get
messy) and flock or cotton wool to show the tail. The tail is
teardrop-shaped and is approximately 20cm long and 5cm
wide at the broad end, (about the same size as the flame
template from 40K, which can effectively be used instead).
The tail must be placed so that it touches the comet with the
pointy end and pointing directly away from the sunward
edge.


4. WRECKAGE

Wreckage fields are the sad remains of smashed and shattered
ships of all sizes. Too battered to be considered Hulks by any
standard, wreckage still presents a great deal of value to any
fleet stumbling upon it.
Effects: Aside from its method of placement, wreckage is
treated as an asteroid field in all respects, as shown on page
44 of the rulebook. In scenarios using Victory Points,
wreckage fields are worth D6 x 20 VP´s to the player Holding
the Field at the end of the battle.
Placement: Wreckage can be made up from small parts of
ships, metal plates, pieces of armour and the like – in fact,
you can probably make a sizeable wreckage field just by using
all the small items that are in the bottom of your bits box!
Nominate a point on the table and roll a scatter die. The
wreckage is 5cm wide and will extend for D6 x 5cm away
from this point in the direction indicated by the scatter die.


5. HULKS

Although broken and burnt out, the shells of former mighty
warships is still deemed a valuable prize for all sides in a
conflict. Weapons and internal components may be
salvageable and the scrap metal can be reused to build new
ships.
Effects: Hulks follow the rules on page 26 of the Battlefleet
Gothic rulebook. At the end of any battle that uses Victory
Points to determine who won, the player who is considered
to be Holding the Field, as described on page 66 of the
rulebook, will receive bonus Victory Points for the Hulks. 25
points will be given for every Escort and 75 points for each
Capital Ship.
Placement: You can model up your own Hulks if you wish,
but you can freely use any spare ships you have to represent
them instead. Place D6+2 Hulks, at least half of which must
be Escorts, within 20cm of each other. The Hulks are
stationary and will not move during the game.


6. METEOR SHOWER

Considered to be one of the greatest natural threats to space
travel, meteor showers can spell doom for any ship unlucky
enough to fly into one of them. Although very similar to
ordinary asteroid fields they differ by moving through star
systems in random orbits that are both hard to detect and
map out on the space charts. Captains are well advised to
keep their distance.
Effects: A meteor shower is treated as an asteroid field, as
described on page 44 of the rulebook, with the exception of
two things. The meteor shower will move 2D6cm in a random
direction at the start of each turn and any ship or squadron
caught in it, must pass their Leadership test with a penalty of
–1, to navigate it successfully.
Use the scatter dice to determine the random travel direction.
Placement: Use the normal pebbles and unused kitty litter to
represent the meteor shower. It has the same size as normal
asteroid fields, typically D3x5cm wide and D3x5cm long.


7. ROGUE ASTEROID

Most asteroids are situated together in large groups such as
rings or fields. There is however some, usually larger types,
that tumbles through space alone and in very eccentric orbits.
These objects are considered to be highly dangerous by
spaceship captains, as their random moves can result in
disastrous collisions.
Effects: The rogue asteroid will move 2D6cm in a random
direction at the start of each turn, determined by the scatter
die. Any ship base that is moved over or comes into contact
with the asteroid is in danger of a collision and must pass a
Leadership test to avoid being hit. If the test is failed, work
out the collision as a ram attack with 8D6 damage. The
asteroid will only sustain superficial damage and is not
affected.
Placement: Use a single asteroid counter or one cut out of
polystyrene on a small round base.


8. DERELICT MINEFIELD

Derelict minefields may be centuries old and are most often
uncharted remains of former defences long forgotten. In
some cases they may even have been laid out by a race no
longer present in the area. As can be expected, derelict
minefields are as dangerous to any ships approaching it, due
to its lack of maintenance.
Effect: A derelict minefield works in much the same way as a
normal minefield, as described on page 143 of the rulebook,
except that any mines released from it will track the nearest
ship of any fleet.
Placement: As the rules dictate, the derelict minefield must
be placed near to another tabletop feature, so the players
must decide randomly which one. If no other feature has yet
been rolled for, pick the first one that comes along. Use the
scatter die to determine the direction of its final placement. It
will cover the usual area of D3x5cm by D3x5cm.

MAGNETIC ASTEROID FIELD

Magnetic asteroid fields are made up of large clusters of
either naturally magnetic rock or groups of extremely dense
minerals. Magnetic asteroid fields are much more dense than
a typical asteroid field and have a gravety well much like a
small planet Due to the powerful magnetic and gravitational
pull of these asteroid fields they tend to grow quite large as
they attract all loose materials within their area of influnce
towards them.
Effect: A Magnetic asteroid field follows all rules for a
standard asteroid field except as follows. The magnetic asteroid
field has a gravity well that extends from the edge of the field
up to 10cm. If this field was generated along with any other
asteroid fields setup those asteroid fields so they touch edges
with the magnetic asteroid field, these fields will follow all rules
for a magnetic asteroid field. Attack craft which move through
a magnetic asteroid field will be destroyed on a D6 roll of 4+.
Vessels within the field may not fire at all as the field is too
dense to get an accurate lock. Ships moving at half speed or
less through the field, or coming into base contact with the edge
of one, must pass a leadership test on 2D6 to navigate it
successfully. Ships moving more than half speed must make
this test on 3D6 instead. A ship using all ahead full special
orders or one failing their leadership test will imediatly suffer D6
damage from asteroid impacts, but its shield will block damage
as normal.
Placement: Use the normal pebbles and unused kitty litter to
represent the magnetic asteroid field. Like a normal asteroid
field, magnetic asteroid fields are placed so that they run parallel
to the sunward table edge. Typically magnetic asteroid fields are
D3x10cm wide and D3x10cm long.

I don't make the rules, I just think them up and write them down.

Offline AndrewChristlieb

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2012, 06:17:17 PM »
GAS/DUST CLOUDS


1.GAS AND DUST BELT

The gas and dust belt is much like an ordinary gas and dust
cloud only many times larger. Often these belts are created
from very violent solar flares or when old stars burn out and
shed their outer atmosphere into space.
Effects: Aside from its method of placement, a gas and dust
belt is treated as a gas and dust cloud in all respects, as shown
on page 44 of the rulebook.
Placement: Use the normal flock or cotton wool to represent
the gas and dust belt. The belt extends in a straight line from
one table edge to the opposite table edge, running parallel to
the sunward table edge. It will be the normal D6x2cm in
width.


2. DEBRIS FIELD

These are areas of space not unlike asteroid fields and such
like, created from leftover natural materials, fragments of past
battles or a combination of both. They are however
considered a lot denser and are therefore significantly more
difficult and dangerous to navigate.
Effects: Debris fields combine the effects of both gas/dust
clouds and asteroid fields, as described on page 44 of the
rulebook, so a ship trying to navigate through one will suffer
all the effects of having a blast marker placed on it and will
also have to make a Leadership test to avoid taking damage.
If the test is failed, remember that the ship will count as
having one less shield than normal, due to the gas cloud
effect, so this can prove to be very deadly to Escorts.
Placement: Debris fields can be made from either rocks or
parts of ships, surrounded by flock or cotton wool. Nominate
a point on the table and roll a scatter die. The debris field is
10cm wide and will extend for D6 x 10cm away from the
point in the direction indicated by the scatter die.


3. COMET

A comet is a huge ball of compressed ice, dirt and other light
materials that originate from the fringes of star systems. They
usually move in various eccentric orbits that take them from
the coldness of deep space to the inner regions of star
systems. When a comet gets close to a star, the increasing heat
will melt away its surface, thereby creating its characteristic
tail of gas and dust.
Effects: The comet is treated as an asteroid, as described on
page 44 of the rulebook, so any ship that comes into base
contact with it must pass a Leadership test to avoid taking
damage. The tail is treated as a gas/dust cloud, also on page
44, with the exception that it will block line of sight due to its
greater density. At the beginning of each turn, the comet will
move 10cm towards the table edge furthest from its initial
placement. When this edge is reached, the comet is
considered to have reached its zenith and will begin moving
back the same way.
Placement: Use a small piece of polystyrene to represent the
comet itself (you can use a ice cube, but that will quickly get
messy) and flock or cotton wool to show the tail. The tail is
teardrop-shaped and is approximately 20cm long and 5cm
wide at the broad end, (about the same size as the flame
template from 40K, which can effectively be used instead).
The tail must be placed so that it touches the comet with the
pointy end and pointing directly away from the sunward
edge.


4. PLASMA CLOUD

Though quite similar to ordinary gas and dust clouds, in
terms of origin and appearance, plasma clouds presents a far
greater hazard to space travel. They consist of dense
superheated gasses and highly charged particles, which
resemble processes taking place inside stars, albeit on a much
smaller scale.
Effects: Plasma clouds will block line of sight due to their
greater density Any ship in base contact will count as having
a blast marker and must pass a Leadership test on 2D6 to
navigate it successfully or 3D6 if on All Ahead Full special
order.
Escort ships may reroll the Leadership test. A ship that fails
the Leadership test suffers a Fire critical hit. Torpedoes and
attack craft squadrons which move through a plasma cloud
will be destroyed on a D6 roll of 4+.
Placement: Plasma clouds are placed just like gas and dust
clouds, as described on page 44 of the rulebook. Use the
normal flock or cotton wool to represent the plasma cloud
but paint it in a slightly different colour to offset it from
standard gas and dust clouds.


5. METREON CLOUD

Though quite similar to ordinary gas and dust clouds, in
terms of origin and appearance, Metreon clouds presents a far
greater hazard to space travel. They consist of mostly
hydrogen gas or tiny particles of matter which have, due to the
impact of solar wind and accumulation of charged solar
particles, developed extremly powerful electrical charges.
Effects: A  Metreon cloud is treated as a gas and dust
cloud in all respects, as shown on page 44 of the rulebook,
with the following exceoptions.Attack craft squadrons and
torpedoes which move through a Metreon cloud will be
destroyed on a D6 roll of 4+. Any escort squadron or capitol
ship within or in base contact with the cloud will suffer D6
lightning arc attacks following all rules for lightning arcs on
page 73 in Armada. In addition if any ship has no shields or
they're shields are down for any reason they will immediatly
suffer a critical hit as the built up energy within the cloud plays
havoc with shipboard systems.
Placement: Metreon clouds are placed just like gas and
dust clouds, as described on page 44 of the
rulebook. Use the normal flock or cotton wool to represente
Metreon clouds but paint it in a slightly different colour to
offset it from standard gas and dust clouds.


6. RADIOACTIVE CLOUD

Though quite similar to ordinary gas and dust clouds, in
terms of origin and appearance, radioactive clouds presents
a far greater hazard to space travel. They consist of mostly
hydrogen gas or tiny particles of matter which have been
exposed to exterme amounts of radiation, usually over a
period of hundreds if not thousands of years.
Effects: A radioactive cloud is treated as a gas and dust
cloud in all respects, as shown on page 44 of the rulebook,
with the following exceoptions.Attack craft squadrons, not
torpedoes!, which move through a plasma cloud will be
destroyed on a D6 roll of 4+. Any escort or capitol ship
within or in base contact with the cloud that either has no
shields or that has their shield down for any reason including
being in base contact with the radioactive cloud will suffer a
point of damage on a D6 roll of 4+ as the unshielded crew
are exposed to leathel levels of radiation.
Placement: Radioactive clouds are placed just like gas and
dust clouds, as described on page 44 of the rulebook. Use
the normal flock or cotton wool to represent the Radioactive
cloud but paint it in a slightly different colour to offset it from
standard gas and dust clouds.


7. METAPHASIC CLOUD

Metaphasic clouds are something of a wonder fo a starship.
They are made up of highly charged particles similar to
those found in a plasma cloud, however instead of
manifesting as a destrucive force these particles are
repulsed by the presense of all know vessels so that a ship
passing through the cloud is in effect traveling through
normal space within a bubble formed by these particles.
Additionally the particles within these clouds have an
energizing effect on ships as they buzz around it that boosts
power levels and  has even been seen to act as a stimulus
on the Tyranid beasts.
Effects: Metaphasic clouds is treated as a gas and dust
cloud in all respects, as shown on page 44 of the rulebook,
with the following exceoptions.Attack craft squadrons and
torpedoes which move through a plasma cloud will be
not destroyed as the cloud parts for their passing. Any
escort or capitol ship within or in base contact with the cloud
will count as having an additional shield (even if they do not
normally have shields) has the charged particles form into a
barrier around the ship. Additionally ships  within or in
contact with the cloud will receive one additional die in the
End Phase to repair critical damage as the extra energy is
shunted to damage control systems.
Placement: Metaphasic clouds are placed just like gas and
dust clouds, as described on page 44 of the rulebook. Use
the normal flock or cotton wool to represent the Metaphasic
cloud but paint it in a slightly different colour to offset it from
standard gas and dust clouds.


8. CERULEAN CLOUD

Cerulean clouds are made up of small particles and elements
that large amounts of low level energy and radiation. Altho
cloud is harmless to ships and theyre crew it does play havoc
on targeting systems and shields. Due to this these clouds are
a fovorite spot for pirates to hide in andprove quite useful for
ships attempting to disengage.   `
Effects: A cerulean cloud is treated as a gas and dust cloud in
all respects, as shown on page 44 of the rulebook, with the
following exceoptions. Cerulean clouds block all line of sight.
Any escort or capitol ship within or in base contact with the
cloud cannot fire or be fired upon. Additionally their shields
will be completly down. Any ship with in, or in base contact
with the cloud attempting to disengege may roll 3D6 and
choose the 2 lowest for their leadership test.
Placement: Cerulean clouds are placed just like gas and
dust clouds, as described on page 44 of the rulebook. Use
the normal flock or cotton wool to represent the cerulean
cloud but paint it in a slightly different colour to offset it from
standard gas and dust clouds.


9. TEMPORAL VORTEX

A temporal vortex is identical to a warp rift, in the sense that
it is a hole in the fabric between normal space and warp
space. However, in addition to the distorting effect it has to
physical space, a temporal vortex may also affect time itself.
Captains moving their ship into it, run the usual risk of being
lost in the warp but successful navigation may bring valuable
time for repairs.
Effects: Any ship that moves into contact with the temporal
vortex, must pass a Leadership test on 3D6 to navigate it
successfully. If the ship passes the test, it will phase out for D3
turns. It may repair one damage point and/or critical for each turn
it is phased out and thereafter be turned to face in any direction.
If the test is failed, the ship is lost in the warp as described under
warp rifts on page 45 of the rulebook.
Placement: Use a round template of either paper or
cardboard to represent the vortex. It is D3x5cm in diameter.
I don't make the rules, I just think them up and write them down.

Offline Dan_Lee

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2012, 01:06:16 PM »
I think these all look quite good. The only thing I would say is that the rolling 2d3 method is a bit clunky. Even though you only have nine of each celestial phenomena, you can still use a 2d6 table, just make some types of phenomena occur more than once in the table.
Various BFG and other gaming articles that I've written can be found (and downloaded for free) on my website, www.danleeonline.com. Enjoy.

Offline AndrewChristlieb

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2012, 04:43:34 PM »
True, like I said tho 11 would be ideal, I might do some more research and see what I can come up with, of course debris fields and gas/dust or asteroid fields could just occupy 2 spots each but that seems somewhat uninspired :/. I do want this to be as simple as possible for people, having a lot of steps just to setup can be a pain. The real benefit here is for setting up narrative scenarios, but I wanted it to translate to basic setup format.
I don't make the rules, I just think them up and write them down.

Offline Thinking Stone

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2012, 03:44:45 AM »
I see some of those movie/games references.... :)

Aside from the dodgy-but-cool physics (I'll do some thinking and hopefully have some more science-friendly ideas), these seem quite good. I'll have to come back when I've some more time, but a key point I have in mind is that although space is quite empty, BFG battles are almost always near something interesting. Otherwise, why would they fight over it?

So, perhaps there should be some kind of 'central battlefield phenomenon', for example: 1. Planetary body; 2. Strategic Asteroid field; 3. Strategic Nebula ( = gas cloud); 4. Warp-point; &c.. And then there would be other, peripheral things; each bit could have its own speciality. These would be for the whole table redux, I realise as I write this :), but I think that this is a good way to design a table.

But, more on topic, it would probably be more realistic to have phenomena characteristics that have a range of values. So, for an example gas cloud:
Sensor disruption: 1. Light, 2. Medium, 3. Intense. Light = Right shift on WB chart. 2. Leadership affected? + light. 3. Blocks line of sight + Medium.
Constitution: 1. Dust. 2. Volatile. 3. Radioactive. 4. Useful minerals. Dust: no further effect or lance effects?. Volatile: more damage when hit by WBs? Radioactive = hurts ships hiding in it. Useful minerals: good for repairs, but more susceptible to damage when using it? One could also have some fun representing non-linear physics (like self-focusing lance lasers!)
Other: 1. Dense. 2. Metallic bodies within. 3. Inhabited.... 4. Sensor-enhancing. 5. Water!!!
Some of these traits could also enhance victory point scores for locations (e.g. useful minerals and metallic bodies could give +10 VPs for every square inch; just a suggestion :) not intended as a realistic amount).

And so on for more terrain!

Offline AndrewChristlieb

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2012, 05:49:53 AM »
Those sound good, ill have to play around with them :).
I don't make the rules, I just think them up and write them down.

Offline harec

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #7 on: April 19, 2012, 08:54:37 PM »
I think this rules are awesome, but with one exception, the radiative cloud.
This is Just as constructive critic.
Well I know that radiation is a very bad thing to deal for earth lifeforms, but, indeed the most powerfull radiactive source of a solar system is... the star of that solar system. what I`m trying to say is that I don`t agree with that rules. Radiation should not inflic damage to a spaceship.

I would consider the radiactive cloud a commond gas cloud but also applying the rules of a solar flares to ships in I think it would be more science-friendly ;). And also eldar ships could have an extra rule as they use solar sails.

But anyways I was thinking on doing something similar and I like a lot this rules.;)
I colaborate with a spanish blog called profanus40k.
http://profanus40k.blogspot.com.es/

Offline AndrewChristlieb

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2012, 01:36:19 AM »
Thanks the radioactive clouds detrimental effect was due to the loss of crew (most damage in the game fluff wise is from crew losses not actual structural damage). That aside Ill try it as you suggested and see if it works better!
I don't make the rules, I just think them up and write them down.

Offline afterimagedan

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2012, 05:02:00 PM »
Any luck with the modifications?  I really like these rules.

Offline AndrewChristlieb

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2012, 08:30:05 PM »
I haven't had a chance to play around with it yet but I should this week sometime, hopefully :p
I don't make the rules, I just think them up and write them down.

Offline afterimagedan

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2012, 01:43:47 AM »
I would like to try some out at some point. I am not sure about Wreckage because it seems like it would just make the winner win by more and draws less likely. Is this the intention? Other than that, these rules are awesome. Can I post it as a resource on my blog and give you credit?

Offline AndrewChristlieb

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Re: Celestial Phenomena
« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2012, 04:41:55 AM »
Actually wreckage is one of the rules that I picked up from warp storm. I actually started this project to add to story driven scenarios which is one of the reasons that i liked the wreckage rule and  borrowed it. The scenario I had most in mind would be for mid to late campaign game that revolved around an attempt to control a large graveyard. The additional vp and therefor renown could allow a player that had been in a losing position to balance back out or push a player near the top over the edge. I don't mind this being reposted but I cannot take full credit for the work, the only problem is that the original work I borrowed was anonymous iirc.

The radioactive cloud is quite interesting with a leadership negative, I took a cue from the BBB and used a modified version of the radiation burst basically by rolling a D6 and applying the result as a -leadership value equal to the die roll for the duration of the game. It's quite interesting this way because the result leaves the cloud as anything from a minor annoyance on level with a standard gas cloud upto nearly complete avoidance. I like how this works but more testing must be done :).
I don't make the rules, I just think them up and write them down.